Tag Archives: risk

Prioritising a Product Backlog When Everything is Important

The product backlog is an essential product management tool: It captures detailed product decisions and directs the work of the development team. The latter requires it to be prioritised or ordered. But how can you prioritise a product backlog when everything seems equally important? This article shares my answer. It recommends taking four steps to get to an effective, prioritised product backlog.

Leveraging Failure in Product Management

Innovation and failure go hand in hand. It’s impossible to bring new products and features to life without taking informed risks and making mistakes. But effectively leveraging failure can be challenging on a personal and organisational level: As individuals and companies, we want to succeed, not fail. This article shares my recommendations on how to fail well and learn from it.

10 Tips to Fully Leverage the Product Backlog

Working with the product backlog can be challenging, and many Scrum product owners wrestle with overly long and detailed backlogs. This article shares ten practical tips that help you take full advantage of your product backlog.

How to Choose the Right Product Validation Technique in Scrum

Scrum employs the product demo as its default technique to understand if the right product with the right features is developed. While a product demo can be very effective, it can also be limiting. Like any research and validation technique, demoes have their strengths and weaknesses. This post provides an overview of alternative validation methods so you can choose the one that is best suited for your product.

A Template for Formulating Great Sprint Goals

Working with sprint goals is a powerful practice. But many product owners and teams don’t leverage sprint goals or don’t apply them correctly: Sprint goals often state the stories to be implemented rather than the reason for undertaking the iteration. That’s rather unfortunate: Effective sprint goals serve to test ideas, to deliver features, and to foster teamwork. This post introduces a sprint goal template to help you write powerful sprint goals to build great products.

User Stories are Not Enough for a Great User Experience

Creating a product with a great user experience requires more than just user stories. While capturing the product functionality is important, the user journeys, the visual design, and the nonfunctional properties have to be described too. Stories should be complemented with other techniques including scenarios, storyboards, and design sketches.

The Minimum Viable Product and the Minimal Marketable Product

The minimum viable product (MVP) and the minimal marketable product (MMP) are two powerful concepts: The MVP helps you test your ideas. The MMP enables you to launch your product faster. This post discusses both concepts together with their relationship.

Combining Lean Startup and Scrum: Product Discovery and Development

Can Lean Startup and Scrum be combined? And if so, how do they fit together? This post shares my answers for blending the two models, and it maps out a high-level process for product discovery and product development.

Agile Scenarios and Storyboards

User stories are great at capturing product functionality. But they are less suited to describe complex user interactions. This is where scenarios and storyboards come into play: Both are great tools to describe the interaction steps. In this post, I explain what scenarios and storyboards are, how they can be used effectively in an agile context, and how they relate to user stories.

Nonfunctional Requirements

This post discusses nonfunctional requirements such as performance, robustness, and interoperability, and the Ford Shelby Mustang GT500.