Tag Archives: learning

Growth Mindset in Product Management

Learning is crucial for us product people. As our products change and eventually mature, we must change the way we manage them. As our jobs change, and we have to grow into them and acquire new skills. Additionally, product management is a comparatively young profession that is still evolving; new models and techniques emerge. This article discusses how embracing a growth mindset helps you succeed as a product professional.

Leveraging Failure in Product Management

Innovation and failure go hand in hand. It’s impossible to bring new products and features to life without taking informed risks and making mistakes. But effectively leveraging failure can be challenging on a personal and organisational level: As individuals and companies, we want to succeed, not fail. This article shares my recommendations on how to fail well and learn from it.

The T-Shaped Product Manager

Product management is a multi-faceted discipline. This makes our work interesting and varied. But it can also make it hard to see which skills we need to develop so we can do an even better job or take on more responsibility. In this post, I discuss balancing product-specific skills with generic product management capabilities. I suggest developing a t-shaped skills profile that ensures that you have the necessary deep skills to progress your product, as well as the broad skills required to systematically deal with common, recurring product management challenges.

10 Product Backlog Tips

Working with the product backlog can be challenging, and many product owners wrestle with overly long and detailed backlogs. This blog post provides ten practical tips that help you work with your product backlog effectively.

How Minimum Viable Products & Features Helped Me Write “Strategize”

A minimum viable product (MVP) is often mistaken as the first general release of a product, the initial offering that is good enough to address the early market. But for most products, an MVP should be a much earlier and cruder version that acts as a learning device—a means to test a crucial assumption and make the right product decision. This post shows how I used MVPs and MVFs—minimum viable features—to write my latest book, Strategize.

10 Leadership Qualities of Successful Product Managers

Learn how to develop 10 important leadership qualities that help you become a successful product manager and effective product leader. Grouped in pairs, the qualities balance and complement each other.

10 Tips for Creating a Product Strategy with the Product Vision Board

This post does what its title says: It shares my recommendations for creating an agile product strategy using the Vision Board. It addresses readers who want to find out more about using a product strategy in an agile, dynamic environment and readers who want to get better at using the Vision Board.

The Product Owner’s Guide to the Sprint Retrospective

The sprint retrospective is the key mechanism in Scrum to improve the way people work. Some product owners believe though that they should not attend the meeting, and if they do then only as guests and not as active participants. But the retrospective does not only benefit the development team and the ScrumMaster; it is also an opportunity for the product owner to learn and improve, as this post explains.

A Template for Formulating Great Sprint Goals

Working with sprint goals is a powerful practice. But many product owners and teams don’t leverage sprint goals or don’t apply them correctly: Sprint goals often state the stories to be implemented rather than the reason for undertaking the iteration. That’s rather unfortunate: Effective sprint goals serve to test ideas, to deliver features, and to foster teamwork. This post introduces a sprint goal template to help you write powerful sprint goals to build great products.

Succeeding with Innovation and Maintenance

Keeping a product successful can be tricky: New features have to be developed to ensure that the product stays beneficial and attractive. At the same time, smaller improvements and bug fixes are required to maintain the product. How can this be done? This post shares my answer how to balance innovation and maintenance work.