Tag Archives: grooming

Sprint Planning Tips for Product Owners

As its name suggests, the sprint planning meeting sets up the sprint and establishes what can be done. While it’s an important meeting, I find that some product owners struggle with it. The following tips help you reflect on how you use the meeting and discover how you can get the most out of it.

When should Product Backlog Grooming Take Place?

A well-groomed product backlog facilitates the development of a successful product: It incorporates new insights and learning, and it provides items that are ready to be implemented. But when should you work on the backlog? Before the new sprint starts or afterwards? And how can you decide which option is appropriate? In this post, I discuss four options with their benefits and drawbacks to help you make the right choice.

10 Product Backlog Tips

Working with the product backlog can be challenging, and many product owners wrestle with overly long and detailed backlogs. This blog post provides ten practical tips that help you work with your product backlog effectively.

How Detailed should the Product Backlog be?

The product backlog is a great tool. But using it effectively can be difficult. One of the challenges is to get the level of detail right. An overly detailed backlog is unwieldy and hard to manage. But a product backlog that is too coarse-grained is also not helpful: It provides too little guidance for the development team. This post helps you strike the right balance between too much and too little detail. It shows you how determine the right amount of detail for your product backlog.

5 Common User Story Mistakes

User stories are a simple, yet effective way to communicate how a user or customer employs a product. But writing user stories that help a team build great software can be challenging. The post shares five common user story mistakes and how to overcome them.

The Product Backlog Grooming Steps

Grooming the product backlog helps you make the right product decisions by integrating new insights into the backlog, and it helps you get the product backlog ready for the next sprint. In this post, I share a systematic approach to carrying out the grooming work that takes into account new feedback and data, leverages a collaborative approach, and comprises of key five steps.

Agile User Interface Design

The role of design still puzzles many agile teams I work with. When should the design activities take place? Who should carry them out? How are design decisions best captured? This blog tries to answer the questions by discussing a user-centric, iterative, and collaborative design process for Scruma and Kanban teams.

The Definition of Ready in Scrum

“Ready are you? What know you of ready?” says Yoda to Luke Skywalker in the Star Wars movie “The Empire Strikes Back”. Just as it’s important for Luke to understand what “ready” means, so is it for product owners. Luckily, you don’t have to become a Jedi to find out. Reading this post will be enough.

Refining User Stories

User stories come in different shapes and sizes. Large stories, also called epics, allow quickly sketching product functionality, which is handy for scoping a major release. But it means that larger stories have to be eventually refined and broken down into smaller, detailed ones, which the development team can implement. This post shares some tips to help you systematically refine your user stories.

The Lean Product Backlog – Limit Variation and Prevent Overburden

Many product backlogs are too long, detailed and complex. This is in stark contrast to what the product backlog should be: a simple artefact listing the outstanding work to bring the product to life. This blog post discusses lean techniques to make the backlog concise and focussed by avoiding variation and overburden.