Tag archive for "grooming"

How Detailed should the Product Backlog be?

The product backlog is a great tool. But using it effectively can be difficult. One of the challenges is to get the level of detail right. An overly detailed backlog is unwieldy and hard to manage. But a product backlog that is too coarse-grained is also not helpful: It provides too little guidance for the development team. This post helps you strike the right balance between too much and too little detail. It shows you how determine the right amount of detail for your product backlog.

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5 Common User Story Mistakes

User stories are a simple, yet effective way to communicate how a user or customer employs a product. But writing user stories that help a team build great software can be challenging. The post shares five common user story mistakes and how to overcome them.

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Roman’s Top Ten Product Backlog Tips

Using the product backlog can be challenging, and many product owners wrestle with overly long and detailed backlogs. This blog post provides ten tips that help you work with your product backlog effectively.

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The Definition of Ready in Scrum

Thu 16th December 2010

High-priority product backlog items must be ready to be transformed into working software. Find out what does “ready” means and benefit from Yoda’s advice.

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The Scrum Product Owner Role on One Page

The product owner is a key role in Scrum. But many teams and many organisations struggle to fully understand and to effectively apply the role. This post wants to help you get it right by providing a concise overview of what it means to be the product owner.

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The Lean Product Backlog – Limit Variation and Prevent Overburden

Fri 23rd July 2010

Many product backlogs are too long, detailed and complex. This is in stark contrast to what the product backlog should be: a simple artefact listing the outstanding work to bring the product to life. This blog post discusses lean techniques to make the backlog concise and focussed by avoiding variation and overburden.

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